Brands

  • 45R

    Logo 45R

    The 45-year-old Japanese brand 45R represents the very essence of the concept of “slow fashion”. His creations, meticulously made by hand, are real treasures, which age with their owner. 45R indeed uses a lot of traditional printing and dyeing techniques called basin or Shibori, which it carries out in Yamagata - a small town in northern Japan known for this craft. They allow the hues to fade naturally with time and exposure to the sun, softening the tones, reminiscent of watercolor painting. It takes about a year for garments dyed in such a way to go from design to stores. First of all, everything is drawn by hand, from the piece to the patterns, and orchestrated by Ms. Midori Matsubara, the designer of the house. The designs are then handed over to an engraver, who makes the print frames and sends them to Suzuki Nassen, the small factory of 25 craftsmen, located in this small mountain town of Yamagata. The prints are applied by hand, pressing the frame against a roll of pre-dyed fabric, attempting to maintain uniformity. The basin solution, applied on top, extracts the dye, then the prints are washed away, revealing the patterns. It is 100 times longer than modern screen printing. We are far from the brands that come out of weekly collections! The house even often offers a denim cleaning and color restoration service in its stores.

    To treasure old things, old techniques and old sages, such could be their motto. Such attention to detail and passion for craftsmanship comes at a price, but these creations are the ones that keep a living.

  • BEAMS

    Logo BEAMS

    The first BEAMS store opened in February 1976 in a tiny shop inside a building in Harajuku. Today it is a sprawling monster in the world of fashion and lifestyle in Japan. The inspiration is often American, especially in its early stages. The layer was placed on the lifestyle of students in major universities across the Atlantic. Today, BEAMS is a group with dozens of brands and countless points of sale, even internationally. The style is timeless, authentic, sometimes almost nostalgic, from casual to streetwear.

  • COMING SOON

    Logo Coming Soon

    COMING SOON, described as a “super casual capsule collection”, was launched in 2008 by Yohji Yamamoto and the company Italian Design Licensing Sinv Spa. Keizo Tamoto, then CEO of Yamamoto Inc, described it as "a more affordable line aimed at younger consumers looking to transition from streetwear to more stylish pieces". Coming from the always fertile and often poetic imagination of the Japanese house, COMING SOON distills creations that are both simple and endowed with great technicality, relaxed and timeless, feminine and masculine. By nature anonymous, this is the first Yohji Yamamoto license without the designer's name or signature on the label.

  • COMME des GARÇONS

    COMME des GARÇONS logo

    How to talk about fashion in Japan without going through this must-have iconoclast?

    Created in 1969 by the Japanese designer Rei Kawakubo, this brand has revolutionized the vision of style, with her visionary intelligence. These are conventions, especially Western ones, on beauty, the construction of a garment and so many others, denounced one by one. A collection presented in Paris in 1981 and success will take root, little by little in the West. Long marked by the exclusive use of black, the collections exploded in color from the mid-1990s; they also use asymmetry in a recurring way and the voluntary degradation of certain models which are perforated or torn. Junya Watanabe will join the house later, responsible for the Knitting line, men's ready-to-wear and his own line for women. Always avant-garde, he is a master in the art of "techno-couture", the meeting between technology and fashion, passionate about materials, cutting and draping.

  • EVISU

    Logo EVISU

    Denim is a religion at Evisu. The name and logo refer to EVIS, god of prosperity in the Buddhist religion, a name that is reminiscent of a famous American jeans brand. Evisu is also a hype district of Tokyo.

    Evisu, or the story of a man who pursued his passion. Hidehiko Yamane is a “jeans otaku”, one of those denim freaks that only exist in Japan. A collector of vintage, authentic and period jeans, he dreamed of one day making the best denim in the world, respecting the manufacturing methods of the pioneers of jeans and with his personal touch.

    In 1988, he unearthed American clothing machines from the 1950s and decided to make his own denim. He paints the pattern on the back pockets himself, which depicts a seagull in a very minimalist way, and produces about a dozen jeans a day. The seagull brand has gradually taken off, for the success that we know today. Always original and authentic, this brand has become a reference.

  • GVGV

    Logo GVGV

    The GVGV brand was born in 1999, under the pencil of Mug. It's the essence of sleek Japanese style, always practical and with hints of luxury. Natural and delicate textures, fluidity, wide color palettes, sometimes genderless, the brand has made its mark since 2003, the year of its first show at TOKYO COLLECTION. Note a collaboration with Uniqlo and a men's capsule with Opening Ceremony.

  • IRIÉ

    Logo Irié

    Arrived in Paris by the Trans-Siberian Express with little money and without precise plans, Irié worked for Kenzo Takada from 70 to 79, after a brief stint with Hiroko Koshino. He launched his own collection and opened a shop in 1983, on a whim, he said, after buying a Corinthian column at the flea market, which had to be sheltered. Irié, omnipresent, has always kept control of everything. Despite his success, he seems to have voluntarily maintained a human dimension. Its style combines simplicity and efficiency, a form of very raw elegance, adaptable and customizable, for all women. It is also colorful and likes to play with patterns, floral, fancy or animal. Comfort and convenience are always central. Sometimes unusual details, sequins, holographic prints, plastic are added. It's a bit of an idea of effortless Parisian chic for any occasion. He said he was motivated to create clothes that allow a woman to have lunch with her banker in Paris 16th, then drink a hazelnut coffee with Left Bank friends. Its signature material is Irié Wash, soft and light stretch, machine washable. His influences are very French: fascinated by the world of Truffaut and Godard, Parisian life from café to café, he adds a few Japanese notes in the second reading, here and there. His Parisian boutique, all in chrome and mirrors, colored marbles and adorned design, in no way reveals the desire not to develop further, to avoid power games and notoriety problems. We invite you to discover it!

  • ISSEY MIYAKE

    Logo Issey Miyake

    Issey Miyake was the first to redefine the standards of clothing. His clothing patterns were very different from those of Western style whose classical construction he restructured. He is considered the founding father of this new school of avant-garde Japanese fashion, which was also the school of Rei Kawabuko and Yohji Yamamoto. Issey Miyake claims that simplicity is often the key to wearing his clothes, which are loose and versatile enough to be worn in different ways. He is well known for his original fabrics, including the famous PLEATS PLEASE permanent pleated fabric collection.

  • JUNKO KOSHINO

    Logo JUNKO KOSHINO

    Junko Koshino is an internationally renowned designer, from a dynasty of women, all rocked by the waves of fashion. Her sisters are none other than the illustrious designers Michiko and Hiroko, and her mother, Ayako, is at the head of a retail empire. Born in Osaka, Japan, Koshino studied design at Bunka Fashion College and first entered the international fashion scene at Paris Collection in 1978. For several decades, she shared her fashion designs in the around the world, including Beijing in 1985, the Metropolitan Museum in New York in 1990, Hanoi in 1994 and Cuba in 1996, among others.

    In 2005, she organized a design exhibition at the Museum of History and the Chinese Revolution in Beijing, and in 2006 she received "Cavaliere dell' Ordine della Stella della Solidarieta' Italiana", a prestigious award on the Italian fashion scene. She was also named an ambassador for “YOKOSO! JAPAN” (Travel Japan) for the 2010 Shanghai World Expo.

    Koshino's works are very varied and include the design of opera costumes (“The Magic Flute”, “Madame Butterfly”), or even interior design and decoration.

    Koshino frequently uses circles, triangles and squares as creative elements. She sees circles as the symbol of nature, while triangles and squares symbolize human civilization: as these three shapes merge and oppose each other asymmetrically, harmony and balance - exquisite - are created.

  • KANSAI YAMAMOTO

    Logo Kansai Yamamoto

    Deceased on July 28, 2020, Kansai Yamamoto is probably one of the most flamboyant creators of his time and his impact is undeniable. It is driven by a philosophy: basara. This Japanese term refers to a colorful and eclectic freedom, bold and luxuriant, at the antipodes of wabi-sabi. His joyful and exuberant vision of fashion clashes with the intellectual rigor and abstraction of his contemporaries Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo. He was the first Japanese to parade in London, in 1971, a precursor to the influence of Japanese fashion, reinventing the kimono, defining an extravagant wardrobe, full of references to Japanese culture, such as Kabuki theatre. He was inspired by traditional craftsmanship (decorative braiding in particular), often experimenting with folds and twists to bring his unusual silhouettes to life. Admired by the whole "milieu" and the artists, he hosted "super-shows", which combined fashion, music, dance and sometimes welcomed more than 100,000 spectators. He shared his passion for the show with David Bowie, whom he dressed for many years on his shows. "I think David felt the energy of my designs contributed to his own energy," he said. Many have been inspired by his work, starting with Nicolas Ghesquiere for Louis Vuitton, who collaborated with him in 2018 to adorn his creations with yakko faces, from Japanese theatre. Rick Owens paid an open homage to Kansai last year at FW 2020, most notably with a one-leg striped jumpsuit with angled shoulders, which was a clear nod to Kansai's "Tokyo Pop" jumpsuit. Alessandro Michele (Gucci) too, with bold patterns and prints of faces, characteristic of Kansai's works.

  • KAPITAL

    Logo Kapital

    Deceased on July 28, 2020, Kansai Yamamoto is probably one of the most flamboyant creators of his time and his impact is undeniable. It is driven by a philosophy: basara. This Japanese term refers to a colorful and eclectic freedom, bold and luxuriant, at the antipodes of wabi-sabi. His joyful and exuberant vision of fashion clashes with the intellectual rigor and abstraction of his contemporaries Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo. He was the first Japanese to parade in London, in 1971, a precursor to the influence of Japanese fashion, reinventing the kimono, defining an extravagant wardrobe, full of references to Japanese culture, such as Kabuki theatre. He was inspired by traditional craftsmanship (decorative braiding in particular), often experimenting with folds and twists to bring his unusual silhouettes to life. Admired by the whole "milieu" and the artists, he hosted "super-shows", which combined fashion, music, dance and sometimes welcomed more than 100,000 spectators. He shared his passion for the show with David Bowie, whom he dressed for many years on his shows. "I think David felt the energy of my designs contributed to his own energy," he said. Many have been inspired by his work, starting with Nicolas Ghesquiere for Louis Vuitton, who collaborated with him in 2018 to adorn his creations with yakko faces, from Japanese theatre. Rick Owens paid an open homage to Kansai last year at FW 2020, most notably with a one-leg striped jumpsuit with angled shoulders, which was a clear nod to Kansai's "Tokyo Pop" jumpsuit. Alessandro Michele (Gucci) too, with bold patterns and prints of faces, characteristic of Kansai's works.

  • KENZO

    Logo Kenzo

    Founded in Paris in 1970 under the name of Jungle Jap, the brand takes the first name of its founder in 1980: Kenzo, or the perseverance of a man. "jungle" will remain for one of its women's lines thereafter. Each successful haute couture house has its own style. Kenzo is like its founder Kenzo Takada, it has always developed a style from elsewhere - Japan - and reflects the stubbornness and talent of its creator. A mix of modernity and romanticism, with hints of Western art and Eastern influences. Colourful, ethnic, nomadic fashion. A style inspired by East and West, travel, prints.

  • Korii Joko International

    Logo Korii Joko International

    Korii Joko is unclassifiable, halfway between a sophisticated style, a new wave side and the DC burando (Comme des Garçons, Yohji and others). She interprets her time in the 80s and 90s in a very unique way. Her clothes are recognizable at first glance. She is often considered to belong, in her own way, to the Japanese avant-garde. She sculpts the female form with concentric circles or adorns it with geometric shapes, enhanced by sought-after materials and transparencies, with which she likes to play. Macrame, embroidery, cordage, lace, organza, silk, texture, yokes, embellishments (beads and other stones), overlays, laser cutouts or sewn finishes, or exaggerated volumes (especially on the shoulders, welcome to the 80s), anything goes. It's so 80's and at the same time so modern. This niche house was mainly aimed at the Western market, from New York to London, via Milan, Paris and Amsterdam, which is why the label proudly bears the inscription “Korii Joko International”.

    She more or less disappeared from the face of the fashion world, but in the late 2000s, she launched a line of accessories and jewelry, made of semi-precious stones, Swarovski crystals, pearls and pearls. freshwater or various types of corals. Gaijin Paris loves it! Too bad his talent could not be expressed longer.

  • LIMI feu

    Logo Limi feu

    How not to be full of talent with such a heritage? LIMI feu, founded in 2000, is a house whose creator is none other than Limi Yamamoto, the daughter of Yohji Yamamoto. She marched at her beginnings, in Tokyo, then in 2007, decided to parade in Paris. The critics hail it and the clientele follows. Like father like daughter. She is a passionate creator who overflows with energy and talent. Like her father, she loves dark colors, large volumes, and asymmetries, but she is more street and has a more rock attitude, less romantic than him. LIMI feu emphasizes ambiance, volume and comfort by eliminating excess, and deliberately leaves space in garments to allow the personality of the wearer to blend in. The silhouettes are often in a straight line, while combining with voluminous and original drapes that surround the body. Gaijin Paris loves it.

  • MICHIKO KOSHINO

    Logo Michiko Koshino

    Born in Osaka, Japan in 1950, Michiko is the youngest of three famous Koshino sisters who all became designers (Junko and Hiroko), and her mother, Ayako, is the head of a retail empire. Freshly graduated from Bunka Fukuso Gakuin, the Japanese design university, in 1975, she moved to London and quickly established herself, fusing Eastern and Western inspirations in her own way. In particular, she became the queen of club culture, combining urban culture and nightlife, highly colorful and techno creations.

    Away from mainstream fashion, it has become cult. In 1987, Michiko Koshino began collaborating with men's clothing brand Motorking; Today they are collector’s items. Its Yen jeans, made only with original Japanese denim, continue to be commercial successes. She also designs t-shirts for the women's clothing brand Q, inspired by street gangs and the urban environment. She also explored cosmetics, underwear, sunglasses and watches. His list of aficionados includes Keith from “The Prodigy”, All Saints, the Spice Girls, Placebo, Talvin Singh and Natalie Imbruglia.

  • PORTER YOSHIDA

    Logo Porter-Yoshida

    Marque recherchée en France, car non distribuée (seulement au Japon et uniquement chez quelques retailers triés sur le volet dans le monde), fondée en 1998 par Yoshida Kakan, qui offre un large choix de sacs et accessoires originaux et bien pensés. Collaborations nombreuses (Visvim, Murakami, Supreme, Neighborhood).

  • sacai

    Logo Sacai

    The enigmatic feminist designer Chitose Abe, having proven herself at COMME des GARÇONS with Rei Kawabuko before going out on her own, in Tokyo in 1999, paraded for the first time in Paris in 2001 She takes her time and likes a form of stability, as opposed to fast fashion. She regularly crosses several garments to give them a haute couture silhouette. And she notably counts Birkenstock and Nike among her recent (and numerous) collaborations. The designer of the most fashionable ready-to-wear labels defines himself as “against the tide”. Deconstructing and rebuilding forever, applying textiles to garments they shouldn't be on, marrying sweaters and jackets or shirts and hoodies, tailoring that can look lopsided or awkward, yet elegant. This breathtaking elegance is what best describes sacai.

  • TOGA

    Logo Toga Archives

    Designed by Yasuko Furuta, who studied fashion design and drawing at Esmod Japan and Esmod Paris. She founded her first brand TOGA in Tokyo in 1997. TOGA refers to Roman togas, a nod to her passion for draping and pleating. His avant-garde vision combines elements of contemporary Western style and traditional Japanese design to create original and captivating pieces. Its collections combine touches of vintage with modern minimalist shapes. She loves to play with prints and develops a style that combines femininity and relaxation. In 2005, TOGA began presenting its collections in Paris, then in 2014 in London. In addition TOGA, has its line of shoes "TOGA PULLA SHOE", its pre-collection line "TOGA PULLA" and its line of men's clothing "TOGA VIRILIS", as well as unique pieces under the label "TOGA PICTA", distributed only in its own stores.

  • TSUMORI CHISATO

    Logo Tumotori Chisato

    After having designed for Issey Miyake, the designer Tsumori Chisato founded her own eponymous house, which revolves around a playful and imaginative style, both pop and poetic. Energy, colors, kitsch patterns, sometimes childish, a skilful use of accessories, from beads to embroidery, to dress these feminine creations. She is a real “weaver of dreams” (cit. Vogue).

  • UNDERCOVER

    Logo Undercover

    Warning! Rare specimen. Revered in the streetwear universe and equally at home in Parisian haute couture shows, the brand is totally hybrid and injected with a good dose of authentic underground Tokyo style. A joyous amalgamation of chaos, determination, fragility, peace and humor, unique to designer Jun Takahashi.

  • Y-3

    Logo Y-3 Yohji Yamamoto

    A hyphen between the brand with the 3 stripes and the world of Yohji Yamamoto. Y-3 has been a cult sportswear and more generally fashion brand since 2001. It was born when the Japanese designer asked adidas to lend him sneakers for his fall-winter collection, the brand being very exposed in Japan. The brand accepted and even offered to imagine with her what the sportswear of the future might look like. Since then, Yohji Yamamoto has been developing his very particular silhouettes, his pronounced taste for black and volumes, but also bright colors, placed on refined materials from hi-tech. Avant-garde, the brand uses materials such as neoprene and specific shapes, multiplies surprising and innovative fashion shows and advertising campaigns, skilfully mixes sport and poetry.

  • Yohji Yamamoto

    Logo Yohji Yamamoto

    "Hiroshima Chic" was long used to describe the style of the artist-couturier, protagonist of the deconstructionist movement.

    Yohji Yamamoto founded his eponymous fashion house in Tokyo in 1972. Ready-to-wear becomes vagabond, black often dominates, clothing is disintegrated, construction questioned, its perennial or perishable side. He deeply marked a generation of Belgian designers.

  • ZUCCa

    Logo Zucca

    Since his first show in 1988, Japanese designer Akira Onozuka has woven a long process of maturity. From his apprenticeship with Issey Miyake from the 1970s, he has retained a strong taste for the creative process. The Zucca universe is all in color, its clothes are practical to wear and come from urban fashion. The clothes are perfectly designed. Zucca opened its first store and developed the Cabane de Zucca line in 1993 in Tokyo, with creations for men, women and children and collaborations with artists of all kinds, who designed windows or interior decoration. In 1994, the brand launched a new line, Zucca Travail, which it described as "work wear for the inactive" which was inspired by work clothes, uniforms and sportswear. This collection is made in France and has even been awarded for its contribution to the manufacturing industry in France. In 1995, Zucca began collaborating with the watch manufacturer Seiko and released one collection per year of watches with gourmet names like Chocolate or Chewing Gum and with an original design. Today, the world is a playground from which the creator draws his many inspirations.

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